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Opera Rose: New Tote Bag

by Cass Art
Opera Rose: New Tote Bag

It's the colour of the summer - hot pink, candy pink, a sunny shade of fuschia...Flossie Saunders from the Sunday Times even put it up there on her 'hot list'.

We are delighted to introduce a new Cass Art tote bag in Opera Rose, a warm shade of pink that's been a must-have in these recent months.

The bag is available now in all our shops for £1.50, or you can get it free if you spend over £30.

The Colour 

Opera Rose was formulated by Winsor & Newton from a new range of colours made with fluorescent pigments. Absorbing energing from the UV High, invisible energy spectrum, the colour then reflects that energy to give off its brightness. 

Let's take a look at the pink paintings that use this stylish shade - but don't worry, we'll leave out all the pink puns. Mostly.

Dexter Dalwood

Dexter Dalwood, The Liberace Museum, 1998, Oil on Canvas

This painting is tickled pink (pun one) with its ornate furniture and pool of a dazzling reflected floor. Dalwood invents imaginary scenes of celebrities' private lives - picturing the glamour and the gaudy, and presenting us with humour. Oceans of pink carpet form the backdrop to a winding staircase and several peculiar sculptures - including a crystal ornament and quizzical baby deer in the back.

Ad Reinhardt
Ad Reinhardt, Abstract Painting, 1951-52, Oil on Canvas

In 1949, Reinhardt's painting became about order and abstraction. This is one of his brick paintings, with the Opera Rose rectangular shapes floating on a slate grey surface. One could say he was painting the town pink. (But we won't, because we're not sure that counts as a good pun.) 

Gerhard Richter
Gerhard Richter, Flowers, 1994, Oil on Linen

The master of painting from photographs, Richter's pink flowers appear intentionally out of focus - hazy, dream-like, as though seen through half-closed eyes. Their vivid petals seem demure against the soft, sweeping paintstrokes of the background, their stems falling limply to the ground. 


Amy Gartrell
Amy Gartrell, Pink (Two Lines Meeting In Space), 2004, Ink, Pen and Pencil on Paper

An exercise in perspective, Gartrell's bold drawing is forthright with its texture and use of line. The pink and purple colours radiate for attention against the linear geometry of the scene, so that you only notice the make up of an interior at a second glance.
Caro Niederer
Caro Niederer, Musella In Autumn, 2008, Oil on Canvas

Pink sky at night, Shepherd's Delight? (That was the last one.We promise.) Niederer's luminous sky threatens a storm, or perhaps the blood warm sun of a perfect morning, against the flowing green brush strokes of the meadow and trees. 


Feeling Inspired?

Add the Opera Rose bag to your collection, by visiting any of our shops and spending over £30. Alternatively you can buy one for £1.50.

Take photos of your Cass Art bag collection, your oldtime favourite or your new pink bag and upload them to Pinterest, Twitter and Instagram with the hashtag #CassArt.

Also tell us what you think of Opera Rose on Twitter and Facebook - we'd love to know your thoughts!